Reach for a Muskoka Moment,
by the Moon and Stars

Huntsville, Ontario, Canada

42 Yonge Street South, Huntsville, Ontario
amuskokadream@cogeco.ca
Office - 705 788 0175
Cell - 416 708 8936

A Muskoka Dream Catcher

The dreamcatcher is based on an old Native American tradition where hanging a symbolic web over a sleeping individual would protect them from bad dreams. The web was made from a round wooden hoop, with fabric or yarn woven into a circular pattern, creating a center whole in the middle of the dreamcatcher. Typically feathers were hung from the bottom of the hoop for astatic purposes. Hung above the dreamer, the dream catcher filters dreams, blocking all nightmares and only allowing good dreams to pass through.

Guest Amenities:

Reasons to choose a B&B, but you already know this!

Your breakfast

Breakfast is the most important meal of the day! Allow us to feed you a full hearty breakfast around your schedule. Have a special dietary request? Not a problem. I try to accommodate vegetarian, and gluten-free when requested. Don’t forget to mention this the night before, so I can make it hot and ready.

Amenities are free!

Say great! To wifi, parking, coffee, teas and snacks. You will have a complimentary guest refreshments offered in your room. The porch lights on, and someone to greet you when your return home. Remember: I am alway up and about.

Security

If you don’t come home, you will be missed. This is a comforting though especially for European travelers, or singles who travelling, when it’s all about adventure in a far away land. This is a hug plus.

It’s about the Sleep!

Clean and Fresh, Fine linens, comfortable beds, quiet time. You deserve it.

We're centrally located in the heart of Muskoka, a short drive or walk from downtown Huntsville. Your accommodation is a home-away-from-home. Enjoy our warm hospitality. Experience a comfortable night's sleep in a luxury bed with high quality linens and ensuite or private bath. Start your morning with coffee or tea on the deck. Enjoy a full 3 course breakfast, homemade goodies, and scintillating conversation. We feature, local farm products including eggs and Canadian maple syrup. Handmade lotion and soaps are available for your pampering pleasure. Refreshments upon arrival.Free parking.

Places To Go-for a day:

There are more things to do than time usually allows for all seasons. Huntsville is on enroute to beautiful Algonquin Park, you will be surrounded by lakes, rivers and forest. You can canoe, hiking, and biking opportunities are endless. Adventure for everyone. There are numerous golf courses and restaurants within a very short drive. ArrowHeadPark, has excellent groomed cross country skiing, tubing, ice trail.

Moose Facts:

Location:

Location We're centrally located in the heart of Muskoka, a short drive or walk to downtown. Your accommodation is a home-away-from-home. Enjoy our warm hospitality. Start your morning with coffee or tea on the deck. Enjoy a full 3 course breakfast, homemade goodies, and scintillating conversation. We feature, local farm products including eggs and Canadian maple syrup. Handmade lotion and soaps are available for your pampering pleasure. Refreshments upon arrival. Free parking.

OverView:

This is a traditional style of Bed and Breakfast accommodation with a hearty hot breakfast featuring farm fresh eggs, maple syrup and homebaking served daily. We support local products “made in Muskoka”

There are two bedrooms offered for your stay,
Dream Scape: with a queen bed, ensuite with shower, TV, Robes & Slippers, this room is decorated in summer greens.

Blue Heaven: with a queen bed, private bath with a soaker tub, just a few steps away. Robes & slippers. This room is decorated with soft blue grey.

Both rooms overlook the backyard and gardens, and are decorated in earthly greens, gold, and blue. Both rooms include WIFI, a mini fridge, snacks, coffee station, and welcome treats. Enjoy a Muskoka day on the deck under a canopy of trees, you may relax, share stories and a glass of wine.

The Group of Seven

Sometimes know as the Algonquin school, the Group of Seven is a now worldly recognized painting group. Founded in 1920, the Group of Seven was an association of seven self-proclaimed painters, seeking out landscape and scenery to paint throughout Algonquin park and the surrounding area. A close friend to this group, however never a member, Tom Thomson is well known internationally for his paintings of the Algonquin area, and mysterious death in Algonquin park. The Group of Seven and Tom Thomson’s work is now distributed throughout various art galleries and private collections, with many of the pieces valued at well over a million dollars.

Franklin Carmichael (1890-1945),
Lawren Harris (1885-1970),
A.Y. Jackson (182-1972)
Franz Johnston (1888-1949),
Arthur Lismer (1885-1969),
J. E. H. MacDonald (1873-1932),
Frederick Varley (1881-1969)

Tom Thomson died in 1917, and since the Group of Seven was not established until 1920, he was never technically apart of the group. However prior to the group forming, his scenery shots of the rugged Canadian landscape inspired many of the friends, and is often attributed to the creation of the Group of Seven. For this reason, he is still considered one of the group’s founders. Some of his most famous paintings, "The West Wind" and "The Jack Pine" are two of the groups most iconic pieces. Another artist who associated very closely with the Group of Seven was Emily Carr, a famous Canadian painter with a very similar style, however she was not allowed to join in the 20’s as a female painter. Mural replicas of the Group of Seven’s work can currently be seen distributed throughout downtown Huntsville as a tribute to their contribution to Canadian art history.

Huntsville:

Huntsville was named after the first permanent settler of the area, Capital George Hunt. He arrived in the area in 1869, taking advantage of the Ontario Free Grants and Homestead Act. He was responsible for pushing the Muskoka road farther north from Bracebridge up to Huntsville, and establishing a settlement on the east side of the Muskoka River. As farming was declining, many farmers turned to lumber for work, and began seeking new areas to live, north of Toronto. Realizing the beauty of the scenery, many began to take summer tourists into their homes for the summer. By the turn of the century, the progressive village of Huntsville became an official incorporated township.

The present green swing bridge over the Muskoka River is actually the 4th bridge in its location. The original bridge was a raising bridge, however this was modified 3 more times before the current bridge was put in place. In 1876, the locks between Mary and Fairy lake were just being completed, which allowed the first steamship to go through in 1877. By 1888, trains were consistently traveling to Huntsville, with some trains even being heated and having electricity. The station was remodelled in 1898. In 1923 it became the Canadian National Railway. The present station was built in 1924.

The town Hall was designed by Ellis and Belfrey of Toronto in 1926. The post office was located on the main floor (until 1955), and the rest of the building was municipal offices, the courtroom, jail, and firehall, all in the same building. The clock in the tower on the town hall came from the old union Station in Toronto.


  • Responsive image
  • Responsive image
  • Responsive image
  • Responsive image
© Muskoka Dream Catcher. All rights reserved. | Designed by Just Click Web Design